Anti-fracking demo in central Manchester, Sunday march 9th

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Over a hundred people walked-as slowly as the aggressive police pushing would allow- in front of the lorries arriving at Barton Moss on Friday morning. On Sunday, celebrating the postponement of a court hearing to evict the campers, hundreds danced in the layby by the A57 to sounds by DJ Dave Haslam, after enjoying other entertainers including a group of singers from Manchester’s Open Voice Choir.
We want to take our message, that fracking can and must be stopped, to Manchester City Centre, and encourage campaigners from all over the North West and beyond to join us.

Sunday 9th March
Gather at 12 noon, Piccadilly Gardens
March to Cathedral Gardens, near Urbis, for a rally around 2pm.

The demo is called by Frack Free Greater Manchester.

Manchester Campaign against Climate Change will be there with our yellow banner, as one key reason to oppose fracking is that it is a fossil fuel, making climate change worse both because of the fracking process, when methane (a very powerful greenhouse gas) is released into the air, and when the methane (or shale gas) is burnt, producing CO2.

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Why COP 19 fell woefully short of the urgent action we need

History was made at the UN climate talks last week – not by the achievement of a breakthrough in negotiations, unfortunately, but by the unprecedented walk-out by 800 civil society groups and trade unions.

Citing the appalling lack of ambition and commitment manifest at the 19th yearly session of the global climate change conference, NGOs blamed the lobbying from fossil fuel companies for impeding progress at the talks. As WWF put it, “Warsaw, which should have been an important step in the just transition to a sustainable future, is on track to deliver virtually nothing. We feel that governments have given up on the process.”

Their frustration was well founded. The industrialised countries like Japan and Australia used the talks to officially scale back their climate commitments, and the demands of poor countries for clarity on greater climate finance were stonewalled. At the same time, the EU’s credibility was undermined by its failure to increase its completely inadequate 20% greenhouse gas reduction target for 2020. Continue reading